A statewide project equipping K-12 educators to teach Iowa history using primary sources

Teaching Iowa History Logo

Home » Lesson Plans » Beginning End Segregation

The Beginning of the End of Segregation

Lesson Plan Item

General Information
Grade 5th Grade Class N/A Length of Lesson 45 Minutes
Lesson Title The Beginning of the End of Segregation
Unit Title
Unit Compelling Question Why is it impossible for there to be equality when there is segregation based on the color of someone’s skin?
Historical Context:

The picture used as a historical connection to segregation and Iowa was taken from a protest march on November 2, 1963. This protest was a reminder that Iowa also had problems with segregation that needed to be corrected. The march was created to stress the changes and make Civil Rights legislation more meaningful. To this point in America, people had been fighting to end segregation. 1963 was a turning point year for the end of segregation. In 1963, the fight to end segregation became one of the largest mass movements for racial reform civil rights. In Iowa, 900 people attended this rally with speakers like John Howard Griffin who spoke to the ending of segregation laws in Iowa. 

Lesson Supporting Question How did America’s laws during this time create segregation based on a person’s skin color?
Lesson Overview

In this lesson, students will be working to define segregation and analyze why it became a problem in America. The students will first create their own definition for segregation and discuss it with their classmates. After they create their definition, they will compare it to what the actual definition of segregation is. They will use what they learn about segregation to help them find what is the same and what is difference between their definition and the real one. Students will then read a part of a speech from Senator Thomas Martin’s speech on Civil Rights in 1956. This short reading will be used as a text graffiti where students will write their ideas on the text as well as questions about the text. The students will move their text graffiti to the other students that are in their groups. They will use these to discuss with each other what the speech means for segregation during this time. After the text graffiti, students will observe a picture from a Fort Madison civil rights rally. During this time students will formulate questions about the picture, write any observations, and make any statements connecting this to segregation in Iowa and predict what it was like in our home state. This will propel us into the next lesson where they will be discussing the implications of segregation in America. 

Primary Sources Used
Resources Needed
Standard
Lesson Target
  • The students will analyze multiple sources to pull evidence from in order to answer a compelling question.
  • The students will evaluate how people’s perspectives during the desegregation of American schools have been shaped based on the social, economic and political atmosphere
Lesson Themes No themes are assigned for this lesson.
Lesson Procedure
Step Procedure Time Differentiation plan / Additional Information
Bell Ringer  When students walk into the classroom or when it is time to switch subjects, there will be a question written on the board for them to read. The question will be “What is segregation?” The teacher will read the question to students and they will get the first couple minutes of class to write in their social studies journal what they believe segregation means. They will then get a couple minutes to share with their group partners and formulate some more ideas about what segregation means. (The class will be arranged with tables of 4 students). 4 Min  Some students may be behind in writing and need some extra assistance. They will have the definition that we will look at later in the lesson to fill in major parts of the definition. 
Teacher

The teacher will put the definition of segregation on the board by writing it or having it projected on the board. 
“Segregation was the practice of keeping African Americans separate from white Americans and treating them differently because of the color of their skin.” (coming from Study.com)

The teacher will explain to the students that they are now to discuss the definitions with their group members. 
5 Min  Make sure that the definition is ready to project on the board so the students can analyze the definition right after coming up with their own.
Students 

The students will discuss together what was similar and what was different in their definition and the definition given. 
They will use complete sentences disagreeing, agreeing, and asking questions about why their classmates said what they did about segregation.  

After students are done discussing, as a class each group will share something important that they discussed about the definitions of segregation.  
5 Min  Students who are in the bottom level of readiness will be given sentence prompts to help them start the conversation off with each other. Groups that are at the higher levels of readiness will be asked to share their ideas, and then rewrite the definition so that the definition uses some of their ideas as well as some ideas from the actual definition. Groups in the middle will be able to discuss like the assignment asks. 
Teacher 

Students will then be handed the first page of Senator Thomas Martin’s Speech on Civil Rights in 1956. 
https://iowaculture.gov/sites/default/files/primary-sources/pdfs/history...(They will not receive the whole text, just the first page)
This text will be printed on a piece of paper and given to each student to do a text graffiti. 

The teacher will explain to the students that they will have 3-4 minutes to read through the text and write as much information about the short definition that they can, questions, statements, and comparing the definition to what theirs were. 
2 MIn   For this assignment, students who are at lower levels of readiness will only be handed a portion of the speech. The length of the speech will be differentiated based on level of readiness
Students 

Students will read as much of this text in 3-4 minutes marking the most important things they see in the text, or questions that they have. They can also make comparisons to the definitions we looked at. The length of text they receive is under additional information. 
Students will pass their paper to the student next to them and they will either respond or ask more on to what the student next to them said. 
The class will do this 3 times so that each person in the group gets the other students in their groups paper. 

Once students have their papers back, the class can begin to discuss some of the things they wrote down or their group members wrote down. We can formulate a list on the board of some of the information the students discussed.
12 Min 

The groups will be given different parts of the text based on their level of readiness. This will give students the opportunity to fully engage in the text and be able to get through it all in the time given so that they can get the most information about the topic and come up with ideas and questions about the text. Because students are already grouped based on their readiness, it will be easy to give certain groups the text they need to succeed at the task while also being challenged enough. 

Highest group will receive the first full page of the speech. 

 

Middle to high groups will receive the first, 3rd and last paragraph of the speech. 

 

Middle to low groups will receive the last two paragraphs. 

 

Lowest level of readiness will receive the 3rd to last paragraph of the speech. 

Teacher 

Students will read as much of this text in 3-4 minutes marking the most important things they see in the text, or questions that they have. They can also make comparisons to the definitions we looked at. The length of text they receive is under additional information. 
Students will pass their paper to the student next to them and they will either respond or ask more on to what the student next to them said. 
The class will do this 3 times so that each person in the group gets the other students in their groups paper. 
Once students have their papers back, the class can begin to discuss some of the things they wrote down or their group members wrote down. We can formulate a list on the board of some of the information the students discussed.

The teacher will then give the students an artifact from Iowa Museums. 
https://iowamuseums.pastperfectonline.com/webobject/E2898ED1-C94C-4662-A...
This artifact is  a protest march that occurred in Fort Madison, Iowa in 1963. On November 2, 1963, 300 people gathered at Central Park in Fort Madison, Iowa for a protest march. Led by local NAACP president Joseph Dulin and author John Howard Griffin, the march was the first day of a two-day event which concluded with a Human Rights Rally.
Explain to the students that they are going to learn more about this photo now, but they are responsible for asking questions about the picture and write them down as a group. 

3 MIn  Students will be grouped based on their readiness and given specific questions or not given questions based on their level of readiness.
Students 

They can also write statements about what they think this picture is about. When they think the picture is, who are the people in the picture, what implications this has on the world during that time, what does segregation have to do with this picture, why are these people doing what they are doing. 
Students will formulate as many questions and ideas they can based on this picture by looking at it for a while. 
They will do this for about 10 minutes and write their answers on a poster sheet to be hung up somewhere in the classroom. 
The poster will be reviewed in the next lesson when the teacher describes what the picture was so that students can see what they were wondering while looking at the picture as well as what ideas they came up with. 

10 Min 

For groups with higher levels of readiness, they will not be given any question prompts. Their task will be to formulate ideas and questions about the pictures using their own prior knowledge on the subject. 

 

Students who are at a lower level of readiness will be given question prompts to help spark their thinking, 

Questions include: 

When do you think this picture was taken?

Who are the people in the picture?

What implications does this picture have on what we have talked about today in class?

What are these people marching for? 
Closure 

At the end of the lesson, students will write what segregation means to them on a sticky note. Using the documents we read as well as the picture we looked at, I will ask them to answer the question, what was the impact that segregation had on America and American schools? During the next lesson, we can begin focusing on the question of why fighting segregation was important

 

 what does segregation mean to you?(corrected above)
4 Min  For students who may need extra support, they can have a sentence prompt that guides their thinking. They may also have the definition in front of them to gather their thoughts. 
Assessment
Formative Assessment
(How will you use the formative assessments to monitor and inform instruction?)
  • The biggest way that I will use formative assessments to monitor students and use that information for the next lesson is by listening to what the students discuss. Each group will be discussing the definition of segregation and I can listen to what ideas students come up with in their discussion. I can use this to tell me if I need to reteach the definition in the next lessons. The students will also be discussing the artifact from Senator Thomas Martin as well as the picture of the protest in Iowa during Civil Rights movements. These discussions will help me get a better understanding of what my students understand about segregation and the implications that this had on people during this time.
Summative Assessment
(How does the lesson connect to planned summative assessment(s)?)
  • This lesson uses a couple assessments that can eventually lead to a summative assessment. By reading sticky notes from students, text graffiti, and the posters they create as groups, I can get an understanding of what information needs to be put on the end of the unit summative assessments. The sticky notes will give me an idea of what I need to reteach during the unit as well as how students will perform on a summative assessment. On a summative assessment will be what segregation is and how it impacted people back during Civil Rights movements. The students were given the definition during this lesson as well as some examples of how it impacted people during this time.
Author Information
Author Reade Reiter Reviewer Dr. Chad Timm, Simpson College Created 06/21/2020 Last Edited 06/21/2020
Lesson Plan Development Notes: Social Studies Methods, Simpson College, Spring 2020

Objects Large for Lesson Plans

No objects were found.