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Inequality in Iowa

Lesson Plan Item

General Information
Grade 12th Grade Class Social Studies Length of Lesson 4 days
Lesson Title Inequality in Iowa
Unit Title
Unit Compelling Question Have all Iowans always been treated fairly? If not, what did those Iowans do to change their experience?
Historical Context:

The Civil War ended slavery but it did not bring African-Americans into full and equal participation in American society.  While "Jim Crow" laws established legalized segregation across much of the South, the North also discriminated, sometimes through laws but sometimes in practice.  Blacks in Iowa established local chapters organizations like the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and sometimes mobilized black churches to promote equal rights.

Even though Iowa law prohibited segregation in public accommodations like hotels, transportation, and restaurants, blacks were often barred or given sub-standard service.  Simon Estes growing up in Centerville remembers that their movie theater required him to sit in the balcony.  Others recall downtown Des Moines theaters adopted the same practice. Black veterans returning from WW II successfully pressured the University of Iowa to allow them to live in university dormitories.  Until then, black students had to find private housing.  In 1948, Edna Griffin and two other Des Moines blacks took Katz Drug to court for its refusal to serve them ice cream at its lunch counter.  They won their case (and a very small penalty) and Katz opened its food service to all.  A Cedar Rapids physician had to pressure local authorities until he was allowed to buy a house in a formerly all-white neighborhood. 

During the Civil Rights marches of the 1960s, local groups echoed their own demands for equal treatment.  In 1965, Governor Harold Hughes appointed Iowa's first Equal Rights Commission to explore and investigate instances of discrimination.  That same year, Iowa NAACP chapters joined with black churches to support Civil Rights efforts in the South.  On March 7, local Des Moines blacks formed a march from the Capitol to downtown in support of the Selma to Montgomery marches.  The efforts across the South captured the attention of the national news media, but Iowa efforts reflected a demand for equality here as well.

Lesson Supporting Question
Lesson Overview


In this lesson students will explore the ways Iowans have overcome inequality and changed policy in the process. They
will explore text sets and create individual projects as evidence to their learning.
 

Primary Sources Used
Resources Needed


https://iowaculture.gov/history/education/educator-resources/primary-sou...

https://iowaculture.gov/history/education/educator-resources/primary-sou...

https://iowaculture.gov/history/education/educator-resources/primary-sou...

https://iowaculture.gov/history/education/educator-resources/primary-sou...

https://iowaculture.gov/history/education/educator-resources/primary-sou...

https://iowaculture.gov/history/education/educator-resources/primary-sou...


Standard
Lesson Target
Lesson Themes Lawmaking, African American Experience, Women's Experience
Lesson Procedure
Step Procedure Time Differentiation plan / Additional Information
Day 1 Begin with brainstorming activity, collecting a list of powers we have to overcome our inequalities somewhere in sight throughout the lesson. 10 minutes  
  Explain that the class will be exploring the ways other Iowans have taken action against inequality. Explain that students will be given a text set about one of two topics. They will explore the text set and document their learning using the Evidence Collection Organizer. Remind students to note where they found particular pieces of evidence in their reading and exploring of the text set alongside information added to the organizer. Tell students that they will be using this information to create a written biography, documentary, audio story, children's book, or other proposed project approved by the teacher which will illustrate the journey taken to change policy and overcome inequality. Explain to students that they will have the remainder of the class period to explore the text set and that you will give an overview of the project and go into more detail the next day.     
Day 2 Instruct students to complete their text set and collection of evidence on the the evidence collection organizer today and begin working on their projects. Explain that the projects must include three things: Examples of inequality faced by the individual or group, steps to overcome inequality, and final policy outcomes and long-term effects. Students will have two days to complete projects.    
Day 3 This is a work day. The teacher will meet with each student to discuss their progress and check in.     
  Distribute the self-assessment during the last 10 minutes of class. Explain that students must submit this with their project. Students must provide evidence in their project for each of the three requirements and explain how the evidence aligns with the requirement. Explain that the teacher will use this evaluation with their own evaluation of the project.     
Day 4 Teacher will collect projects, organizers, and self-evaluations.     
  Teacher will display the essential question on the board. Students will be asked to journal. Teacher will ask students to add answers to the following questions to the journal entry: How has this project changed your understanding how policy changes? Which artifact in the text set was most useful to you? Why? Are you happy with your final project? Why or why not? If you could start this project over, what would you do differently? Why?" 15 minutes  
Assessment
Formative Assessment
(How will you use the formative assessments to monitor and inform instruction?)
  • Students will collect evidence as they explore their text set which will later be used in the creation of their final project. This evidence will be collected on a graphic organizer found in the appendix.The teacher will monitor the completion of this organizer which must be submitted with the final product.
  • The student will be required to provide evidence for each of the three evaluative criteria in their work by submitting the self-assessment found in the appendix. For example, in the student’s documentary, the section from the second minute to the fourth minute describes the steps an individual took to overcome the inequality they faced.
  • Students will answer the essential question in journal form. The journal entry must include an answer and evidence to support the answer as well as a description of how policy was changed in the given example.
  • As part of the final journal entry, students must also answer the following questions: How has this project changed your understanding how policy changes? Which artifact in the text set was most useful to you? Why? Are you happy with your final project? Why or why not? If you could start this project over, what would you do differently? Why?
Summative Assessment
(How does the lesson connect to planned summative assessment(s)?)
  • The student is tasked with telling the story of an Iowan or groups of Iowans who experienced inequality and took steps to eliminate this inequality through policy changes. Students can present this information in the form of a written biography, documentary, audio story, children’s book, other proposed method approved by the teacher.Students will be given one of the two text sets (segregation or women) to use in their research. When their project is complete and all requirements have been met, the students will be required to share with a small group their finished product.Evaluative Criteria:The student must include descriptions of all of the following elements in the final product.If any of the three are missing, students will be asked to revise their work until all three are included. Examples of inequality faced by the individual or group Steps to overcome inequality Final policy outcomes and long-term effects
Author Information
Author Taylor Trimble Reviewer Dr. Lisa Millsaps, University of Northern Iowa Created 04/17/2019 Last Edited 08/22/2019
Lesson Plan Development Notes: Teaching Methods, University of Northern Iowa, Fall 2018

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